DSpace

About the Bionics Institute

 

Bionics Institute Research Online >
Other staff research publications >
Other research publications >


Title: Generation of Neural Organoids from Human Embryonic Stem Cells Using the Rotary Cell Culture System: Effects of Microgravity on Neural Progenitor Cell Fate
Authors: Mattei, Cristiana
Alshawaf, Abdullah
D'Abaco, Giovanna
Nayagam, Bryony
Dottori, Mirella
Keywords: Human embryonic stem cells
Brain development
Microgravity
Organoids
Neural stem cells
Issue Date: Apr-2018
Publisher: Mary Anne Liebert
Citation: Mattei, C., A. Alshawaf, G. D'Abaco, B. Nayagam, and M. Dottori. 2018. Generation of Neural Organoids from Human Embryonic Stem Cells Using the Rotary Cell Culture System: Effects of Microgravity on Neural Progenitor Cell Fate. Stem cells and development: [epub ahead of print].
Abstract: Progress in aeronautics and spaceflight technologies requires in parallel further research on how microgravity may affect human tissue. To date, little is known about the effects of microgravity on human development. In this study we used the rotary cell culture system to investigate whether microgravity supports the generation and maintenance of neural organoids derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) as a model of human brain development. Our results show that although neural organoids could be generated and maintained in microgravity conditions, there were changes in expression of rostral-caudal neural patterning genes and cortical markers compared to organoids generated in standard conditions. This phenomenon was also observed in hESC-derived cortical organoids exposed to microgravity for relatively shorter periods. These results are one of the first for analyzing human neurogenesis in a microgravity environment.
URI: http://repository.bionicsinstitute.org:8080/handle/123456789/293
ISSN: 1547-3287
Appears in Collections:Other research publications

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
2018_Mattei_GenerationofNeural.pdf56.96 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
View Statistics

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

DSpace Software Copyright © 2002-2010  Duraspace -